Tracey Seddon, Head of Organics Conservation at National Museums Liverpool, and Furniture Conservator Graham Usher were two of the team who returned the huge tapestry The Triumph of Fortitude to display at the Walker Art Gallery last week.
Hanging the tapestry, which is almost 500 years old and measures 5 metres by 4.5 metres, was quite a big operation. Read all about it on the blog.

Tracey Seddon, Head of Organics Conservation at National Museums Liverpool, and Furniture Conservator Graham Usher were two of the team who returned the huge tapestry The Triumph of Fortitude to display at the Walker Art Gallery last week.

Hanging the tapestry, which is almost 500 years old and measures 5 metres by 4.5 metres, was quite a big operation. Read all about it on the blog.


With the awards season in full swing there’s been some interesting red carpet creations on show over the past few weeks. This beautiful 1950’s evening dress would definitely have turned heads. 
It’s on show at Sudley House as part of 20th Century Chic:100 years of fashion, a fascinating new display of 12 beautiful outfits charting a century of women’s fashion.  

With the awards season in full swing there’s been some interesting red carpet creations on show over the past few weeks. This beautiful 1950’s evening dress would definitely have turned heads. 

It’s on show at Sudley House as part of 20th Century Chic:100 years of fashion, a fascinating new display of 12 beautiful outfits charting a century of women’s fashion.  


Here’s a behind-the-scenes shot of one of the mannequins waiting patiently to be installed in a new display at the Walker Art Gallery, Mrs Tinne’s Wardrobe, A Liverpool Lady’s Clothes, 1910-1940.
The small display is now open, and has been described as a must for fans of vintage gowns and stunning costume from the early 20th century.
It features 14 outfits from the Tinne collection, 10 of which have never been on public display before.

Here’s a behind-the-scenes shot of one of the mannequins waiting patiently to be installed in a new display at the Walker Art Gallery, Mrs Tinne’s Wardrobe, A Liverpool Lady’s Clothes, 1910-1940.

The small display is now open, and has been described as a must for fans of vintage gowns and stunning costume from the early 20th century.

It features 14 outfits from the Tinne collection, 10 of which have never been on public display before.


This unique dress was designed and created by Liverpool dressmaker Thelma Madine and Ryan Edwards, stylist at hair salon Voodou. A team of eight dressmakers from Thelma’s business, Nico Bridal Wear, took 300 hours to make the dress over a period of three months. It has 12 petticoats, complete with 1,200 crystals and 250 metres of hair extensions, all hand dyed and styled by Ryan.
In November 2011 the dress was worn by the winner of the first Alternative Miss Liverpool pageant, as part of the annual Homotopia Festival. The dress is on display at the Museum of Liverpool until 18 December 2012 as part of the 2012 Homotopia festival.
Using human hair
Due to the current popularity of hair extensions, there is a lucrative international market for human hair. It is often difficult to trace the origins of the hair used in the extensions. This raises serious concerns about human rights and whether the hair may have been obtained unethically in Eastern Europe, Russia and India in particular.
We cannot be completely certain of the origins of the hair used in the extensions which make this dress. As a result, we are using this display as an opportunity to highlight this important issue.
For more information on a range of human rights issues visit the International Slavery Museum.

This unique dress was designed and created by Liverpool dressmaker Thelma Madine and Ryan Edwards, stylist at hair salon Voodou. A team of eight dressmakers from Thelma’s business, Nico Bridal Wear, took 300 hours to make the dress over a period of three months. It has 12 petticoats, complete with 1,200 crystals and 250 metres of hair extensions, all hand dyed and styled by Ryan.

In November 2011 the dress was worn by the winner of the first Alternative Miss Liverpool pageant, as part of the annual Homotopia Festival. The dress is on display at the Museum of Liverpool until 18 December 2012 as part of the 2012 Homotopia festival.

Using human hair

Due to the current popularity of hair extensions, there is a lucrative international market for human hair. It is often difficult to trace the origins of the hair used in the extensions. This raises serious concerns about human rights and whether the hair may have been obtained unethically in Eastern Europe, Russia and India in particular.

We cannot be completely certain of the origins of the hair used in the extensions which make this dress. As a result, we are using this display as an opportunity to highlight this important issue.

For more information on a range of human rights issues visit the International Slavery Museum.


Shauna Richardson with her crochetdermy Red Rum, which is on display in the Liverpool Love exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool until 25 November 2012.
http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/mol/exhibitions/liverpool-love/

Shauna Richardson with her crochetdermy Red Rum, which is on display in the Liverpool Love exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool until 25 November 2012.

http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/mol/exhibitions/liverpool-love/


In this short video crochetdermist Shauna Richardson talks about the Red Rum figure she made for the Liverpool Love exhibition, which is at the Museum of Liverpool until 25 November 2012.

http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/mol/exhibitions/liverpool-love/


Just a few examples of the flora and fauna that have been knitted and crocheted for our displays at World Museum this summer. All of the woolly wildlife will be given to Claire House Children’s Hospice, who will be selling them in their charity shops in order to raise money. 

Find out more about the project and how you could get involved on the blog.


This silk brocade day dress dates from about 1841-1846. It is on display in the Costume Drama exhibition at Sudley House until 17 June 2012.


This dress represents the River Mersey. Astrid Caroe, the daughter of the Danish Consul in Liverpool, wore it to a fancy dress party at the Town Hall in 1912. The dress is now on display in the Global City gallery at the Museum of Liverpool.

This dress represents the River Mersey. Astrid Caroe, the daughter of the Danish Consul in Liverpool, wore it to a fancy dress party at the Town Hall in 1912. The dress is now on display in the Global City gallery at the Museum of Liverpool.


This quilt, titled ‘Pig in the Pen’ by Arlonzia Pettway, is part of the International Slavery Museum’s collections.
Arlonzia is from Gee’s Bend, a small rural community on the site of a former cotton plantation owned by Joseph Gee and his relatives. Over the centuries the women there have developed a bold, distinctive quilting style based on traditional American and African American quilts. 
"When I was nine years old, I made my sister a dress and me a dress out of blue taffeta cloth. My mama saw those two dresses and thought they was bought made. She showed those dresses off to everybody. I just had a head for doing anything. It was just born in me to make things." Arlonzia Pettway
Find out more on the International Slavery Museum website.

This quilt, titled ‘Pig in the Pen’ by Arlonzia Pettway, is part of the International Slavery Museum’s collections.

Arlonzia is from Gee’s Bend, a small rural community on the site of a former cotton plantation owned by Joseph Gee and his relatives. Over the centuries the women there have developed a bold, distinctive quilting style based on traditional American and African American quilts. 

"When I was nine years old, I made my sister a dress and me a dress out of blue taffeta cloth. My mama saw those two dresses and thought they was bought made. She showed those dresses off to everybody. I just had a head for doing anything. It was just born in me to make things." Arlonzia Pettway

Find out more on the International Slavery Museum website.